Category Archives: Society and the Social Contract

Against the Social Contract

It’s typically thought that a contract agreed to under duress is void. Philosophers who have seen the basis of political obligations as something like a contract, therefore, have had to suppose, explicitly or implicitly, that people are not ‘under duress’ … Continue reading

Posted in Society and the Social Contract | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Decency, Nakedness, and the Social Contract

What is it to see a body? What mental structures are involved in seeing a physical object as the body of a person? I think there are two, potentially opposed, aspects to this. On the one hand, the other’s body … Continue reading

Posted in Society and the Social Contract | Tagged , | 3 Comments

The Liar Paradox, the Prisoner’s Dilemma, and the Concept of Political Authority

Most students of philosophy will be familiar with ‘the liar paradox‘, which in its simplest form goes: “this sentence is false”. Other versions might include someone who always lies saying “I am currently lying”, or similar. Is the sentence false? … Continue reading

Posted in Society and the Social Contract | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Messy Social Contracts

I’m quite interested in social contract theory, and a ‘contract’ is something like ‘an exchange of promises’. This gives me an interest in promises and the sort of obligations that they give rise to. Here I just want to run … Continue reading

Posted in Society and the Social Contract | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Social Contracts, Civilisation, and Rioting: the concept of ‘order’

I’m watching the situation in Thailand with ongoing anxiety. I may post something more focused on it in the coming days. But for now I want to ask a philosophical question that it raises. What is ‘order’? On the one … Continue reading

Posted in Society and the Social Contract | Tagged , , | 1 Comment